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Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011

In 2011, Pacifica Radio Archives received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to preserve 150 programs from our vaults, with preservation assistance from George Blood Audio and Video in Philadelphia, PA. The resulting collection encompasses an eclectic array of programs, some of which were only very recently discovered by PRA staff. Among some of the many highlights of the collection are a WBAI interview with Andy Warhol about his film Chelsea Girls shortly after the film’s release ...



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Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Samuel Beckett's radio play Embers directed by Ira Wall and with performances by Stacy Keach and Sudie Bond.
Source: WBAI
"The Harder They Come" is a criminal film produced by Perry Henzell starring Jimmy Cliff and was filmed in Jamaica in 1972. The film tends to defy classification and provides insights to the black Jamaica, not tourist Jamaica. The main character, Ivan, goes to Kingston to find fame but finds himself in difficult situations. This film's soundtrack played an important role in popularizing reggae in the United States. Singer, songwriter and actor Jimmy Cliff discusses his career and how...
Source: WBAI
Don Sortor reads chapters 1 and 3 of Grendel , John Gardner's 1971 re-telling of Beowulf from the monster's point of view. (New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1971). Chapter 1 begins at start of tape. Chapter 3 begins at 00:16:12. This recording does not have Erik Bauersfeld intro.
Source: KPFA
Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton and her "Hound Dog Blues Band" perform at the Museum of Modern Art's "Jazz in the Garden" series on July 22, 1971. The first eight minutes of the recording are a warm-up by Thornton's backing band. David Giorgio introduces Thornton and her band. On this portion of the tape she performs "Mother-in-Law Blues"; "Rock Me Baby"; "Shake, Rattle and Roll"; "Hound Dog"; and "Swing on Home, Big...
Source: WBAI
Charles Ruas and Karen Achenbach talk to filmmakers Albert Maysles and Ellen Hovde about their documentary Grey Gardens . They talk about the origins of the film and how Maysles came to meet the Beales. They describe living conditions in the Beales' mansion. Maysles discusses the acceptance of eccentricity as a character trait in American society. They talk about their shooting schedule, the Beales' own involvement in the direction of the film, and the relationship between the directors and...
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Source: WBAI
David Rothenberg interviews Chris Babcock and Kathy Underhill of the People With AIDS Coalition. Babcock and Underhill talk about the resources that PWAC offers to people with AIDS.
Source: WBAI
A celebration of the 10th annual Lesbian Pride Week, featuring poets & artists who will be appearing during this year's events. Alix Dobkin's song "Women Loving" opens the program. Jewelle Gomez reads her poem "Flamingos and Bears". Eleanor Cooper of Lesbian Feminist Liberation talks about Lesbian Pride Week through the years and about the importance of lesbian pride. Ellen Marie Bissert reads her poem "Ode to My True Nature". Karen Brown, writer and director...
Source: WBAI
Cecil Brown, member of the U.C. Berkeley English Department faculty and author, talks with Elanor Sully about the Voodoo (also called Hoodoo) tradition of Black art and religion in relation to his own work. He has a PhD in African American Literature from the University of California, Berkeley. He talks about his new best-selling novel "The Life and Love of Mr. Jiveass Nigger" which is about a character named George Washington who tells lies but is on a search for identity. He is...
Source: KPFA
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Al Auster reviews Édouard Molinaro's film of the play La Cage aux Folles and Martin Sherman's play Bent , two recent gay-themed productions showing in New York City.
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Bob Alexander interviews the Ramones at WBAI. The band discusses their recent tour and take listener phone calls. One caller asks "What does 'Gabba Gabba Hey' mean?" and "Why do all of your songs have the same beat?"
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Source: WBAI
Sonia Sanchez, teacher poet, essayist, dramatist, and storyteller, delivers two short talks for Black women students: "Development of Social Values and the Birth of a Poet" and "Women in Search of Truth" at the first annual meeting of Associated Women Students Commission (AWSC) of Cal State Long Beach. The talk is introduced by Ujean Uwaymah[sp?] and Sanchez is introduced by Diana Sanchez, student president of the AWSC. On this tape, Sanchez reads from her paper "Social...
Source: WBAI
Diane DiMassa, creator of the cartoon character Hothead Paisan, discusses how her addiction to television and alcohol fueled the development of that character. She talks about how women of color and queer women feel and express rage in ways which are not acceptable to the dominant white culture. She discusses her appreciation of other cartoonists, and the creation of Zine Scene and Hothead's friends. She discusses her fans, male therapists, academics, alcoholism, and getting into fights with...
Source: KPFK
Recording of the Freddie Hubbard Quintet performing at the La Bastille nightclub in Houston on November 21, 1973 (2nd set). They perform "Uncle Albert", "Brigitte", "Little Sunflower" and "Keep Your Soul Together."
Source: KPFT
The Shakespeare Liberation Front reads Grace Paley's short story "The Loudest Voice." Cast includes Deborah Zane, Don Robbins, Sally Francis, Steven Eldridge, Christine Stevens, and Richard Mann. Live music by the Shakespeare Liberation Front Singers with Don Robbins on piano. Adapted for radio and directed by Jeffrey Shandler and Don Robbins. Produced by Claude Eth[sp?]. Live sound effects by Richard Mann. Engineered by Dan Finton. Executive produced by Tim Holcomb. The first three...
Source: WBAI
Women's news with Judy Pasternak for the week of March 7, 1985, incorporating KPFA's Majority Report. Subjects discussed: Katherine Davenport reports on a new law in Montana requiring insurance companies to charge men and women the same rates for the same coverage, including an interview with Ann Brodsky of the Women's Lobbyist Fund in Helena, Montana (00:04:42); Ginny Burson and Karen Sondheim on women's occupational safety and health issues (00:11:23); interview by Mimi Rosenberg with Eileen...
Source: WBAI
Writer and activist Rita Mae Brown (1944 - ) delivers a speech at the Women's Building in Los Angeles on July 4, 1976. Brown talks about the way both men and women suffer under the patriarchy through pornographic violence and nostalgia in the mass media. She tells the audience that "you've got to become an actor, not a reactor" and that the Equal Rights Amendment is a "worn-out issue" meant to distract from more pressing issues. Brown also calls for the feminist movement to...
Source: KPFK
Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton and her "Hound Dog Blues Band" perform at the Museum of Modern Art's "Jazz in the Garden" series on July 22, 1971. The first few minutes are of crowd noise, followed by her band warming up. She performs "Black Angel Blues"; "Ball and Chain"; "I Don't Want Nobody But You"(?); "He's Got the Whole World in His Hand"; "Oh Happy Day"; "Down by the Riverside"; "That Lucky Old...
Source: WBAI
Clare Loeb interviews Claes Oldenburg in Maurice Tuchman's office at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art prior to the opening of the "Art and Technology" show on April 26, 1971. Oldenburg talks about the genesis and creation of his giant writhing icebag sculptures, one of which was exhibited in the show. He talks about the humor in his work, Marcel Duchamp, the sexuality and "Oriental" nature of his sculptures and the link between factory production and technologies of war.
Source: KPFK
Barbara Londin speaks with geologist Sidney Horenstein about the natural features of the New York City borough of Queens. Horenstein explains how all of Queens' parks lie on top of a terminal moraine, how at one point all of the Great Lakes emptied out through the Hudson River, and the evolution of Queens' wooded areas. Horenstein also talks about the proliferation of plant nurseries in Queens in the early part of the 19th century and the pollution of Jamaica Bay.
Source: WBAI
The second of two symposia sponsored by the Esalen Institute on the value of psychotic experience, entitled "The Poetry of Madness", recorded July 31, 1968 at the Longshoremen's Memorial Hall in San Francisco. Question-and-answer session with audience. Panelists discuss the philosophy of George Gurdjieff, whether there's been any success in treating chronic schizophrenics, Scientology, whether anyone's proven that reality exists, "re-educating old ideas versus assassinating...
Source: WBAI
Writer-director Woody Allen (1935 - ) discusses the difference between intercourse and oral sex and President Clinton. Excerpt from longer interview.
Source: WBAI
Pete Wilson hosts a special "Gay Rage" edition of Gay Pride. Program begins with news announcements. Wilson vents his frustration with the journalist Arthur Bell over his article "Hostility Comes Out of the Closet" in the June 28, 1973 issue of the Village Voice. He takes Bell to task for his portrayal of the queer liberation movement and for refusing to talk to him about the article on his show. Wilson takes listener phone calls. One caller reports that transgender activist...
Source: WBAI
Christopher Alexander, a world-renowned progressive architect, discusses the directions of contemporary design at his home in Berkeley. His talk discusses the need for architects to take into consideration the needs of the people for whom they are building. Alexander believes that wholeness and beauty are not vague notions and that buildings should be relevant to their cultural as well as physical landscape. Alexander talks about how non-experts can take control of their own affairs and that...
Source: KPFA
The third and final part of Pacifica Radio's live coverage of Day 3 of the United States Senate Armed Services Committee's hearings on military policies concerning gay and lesbian service in the armed forces. Witnesses include Dr. David Segal, Dr. Charles Moskos, Dr. Judith Stiehm, and Lt. General Calvin A.H. Waller. Junette Pinkney and Bert Wyler offer a recap of the day's proceedings at the end of the recording. Producer Bill Wax pitches for the Pacifica National Fund Drive.
Source: Pacifica National Program
Hosts Bill Barlow and Jerry Washington interview blues singer and pianist Charles Brown (1922 - 1999) before his performance at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. The Rhythm & Blues Foundation's Howell Beagle introduces Brown. Brown performs "I Stepped in Quicksand" (00:12:30), "Save Your Love for Me" (00:19:00), "Seven Long Days" (00:24:34), "Just the Way You Are" (00:29:24), "Black Night" (00:33:59) and "So Long" (00:39:50)....
Source: Pacifica National Program
Poet Amiri Baraka reads several poems at UCLA: "Raising the Roof", "Wailers", "Linguistics", "Reflections", "Sounding". Recording cuts off mid-poem. Contains sensitive language.
Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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This is a documentary which includes interviews and actuality gathered in the streets of Houston, Texas. Individual modules explore the conditions and problems facing the homeless. An abused mother talks about her drug-addict boyfriend who she left and found support in a shelter. Sharon, another victim of abuse, speaks about her experiences as a drug addict and prostitute and her urge to turn her life around. Several others speak about their home life and the reasons for being led into the...
Source: KPFT
Novelist Ishmael Reed, musician Ortiz Walton, and painter Joe Overstreet discuss the traditions of Black art at the San Francisco Black Writers Workshop in 1970. They talk about the history of blacks being discouraged from participating in the arts in the United States, the co-optation of black cultural forms by white people and the difficulty black artists have in getting recognition or grants for their work. Walton mentions the protest of the New York Philharmonic for not hiring black...
Source: KPFA
William Mandel talks about the variety of Soviet newspapers and periodicals. Mandel explains how magazines such as Literaturna gazeta provide a major forum for Soviet citizens to discuss public affairs. Periodicals are printed in a wide variety of languages, such as Armenian, Ukrainian and Yiddish. Mandel also reports on CIA activity in the Soviet Union and takes phone calls where he addresses the general opinions of the USSR on Solzhenitsyn, Stalin, and homosexuals.
Source: KPFA
The second of two symposia sponsored by the Esalen Institute on the value of psychotic experience, entitled "The Poetry of Madness", recorded July 31, 1968 at the Longshoremen's Memorial Hall in San Francisco. Panelists are John Perry, a San Francisco-based psychiatrist; Claudio Naranjo, a psychiatrist from Chile; Allen Ginsberg, poet; and Alan Watts, philosopher and writer; discussion is moderated by Julian Silverman, general manager of the Esalen Institute. Perry discusses Plato's...
Source: WBAI
Casse Culver and Willie Tyson, two lesbian folk singers, perform at an unknown venue. They perform "The Bloods", "Don't Put Her Down", "Truck Drivin' Woman", and "Levee Blues." Extract from a longer performance.
Source: WBAI
KPFK's Barbara Cady and Los Angeles Free Press reporter Helen Koblin interview Jill Johnston, Village Voice columnist and author of Lesbian Nation . Johnston explains her views of lesbianism as the only true radical feminist position. She discusses the purported link between lesbianism and madness, her relationship with her children, and whether the lesbian feminist struggle is equivalent to the oppression of Third World peoples.
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Source: KPFK
New York University's Loeb Student Center's Art Committee joins with the Fine Arts Museum of the Women's Interart Center in presenting a series of special events to salute 1975: Women and Art. Tuesday, May 13, 7pm panel discussion on "Art, Women and the Establishment." Alloway discusses the contributions contemporary women artists have made and coins the term "post-stylistic homogeneity" as it applies to women artists. Gillespie talks about Ivan Karp and how the artists with...
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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An informal discussion between nine lesbians, all in their early-to-mid-twenties, recorded at an apartment in New York City's Greenwich Village and moderated by Charles Hayden (later Randolfe Hayden "Randy" Wicker). The women discuss how one becomes a lesbian, their relationships with their parents, and how they relate to gay and straight men and women. They talk about how the straight world perceives them, comparing lesbian relationships to those of heterosexual and gay male couples,...
Source: WBAI
Ruth Witt-Diamant, Mark Linenthal, Stan Rice, Thomas Albright, Mark Green, and Dr. Francis Rigney discuss the poetry scene in the Bay Area. The panelists talk about Allen Ginsberg's relationship to the current poetry scene, the influence of Black Mountain poets, the multiple dimensions of a poem, and the poetry found in Bob Dylan and the Beatles. Produced by students from San Francisco State College.
Source: KPFA
Jane Fonda speaks at the University of California in Berkeley on January 29, 1973. She gives an anti-war speech at a rally for Pat Chenoweth, a soldier facing charges of mutiny in Vietnam. The tape is courtesy of the Chenoweth Defense Committee. She speaks about the Mekong Delta, Nixon's role, and the resilience and strength of the Vietnamese. Fonda reads a few excerpts from one of the chief negotiators of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of South Vietnam in Paris which talks about the...
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Source: KPFA
WBAI's Paul Wunder asks Woody Allen why there are no black people in his movies at a press conference for Mighty Aphrodite .Excerpt from a longer recording. Full interview published in November 2, 1995 issue of Arts Magazine.
Source: WBAI
Part 3 of Bob Fass' interview with the cast of the Broadway musical Doonesbury . Fass and Levy takes phone calls from listeners. Levy explains how the actors had to imbue the cartoon characters they represent on stage with human qualities.Music edited out of program. Sound quality varies.
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Excerpts from a reading by women whose work appears in Nice Jewish Girls: A Lesbian Anthology , ed. Evelyn Torton Beck, published by Persephone Press (Watertown, MA), 1982. Recorded June 16, 1982 at WomanBooks in New York City. Irena Klepfisz introduces the evening with a message about the crisis in the Middle East. Features readings by Bernice Mennis, Evelyn "Evie" Beck, Irena Klepfisz, Gloria Greenfield, and Melanie Kaye. Produced by Shelley Messing. Contains sensitive language.
Source: WBAI
Laura Malamut moderates a discussion between Knute Stiles, Joe Costello, Henry Sultan, Mark Green and Robert Johnson about the art scene in the Bay Area. They talk about psychedelia as a condition of Bay Area art, the concept of participation, bohemian artists and the police, and whether or not San Francisco is conducive to artists. Produced by students from San Francisco State College.
Source: KPFA
Interview with members of the Willoughby Gospel Singers, a group of senior citizens who reside at the Willoughby Nursing Home in Brooklyn, NY. They perform "I'm so gray" and "Does Jesus care?" among other gospel numbers.
Source: WBAI
This introduction to Peking opera describes the history of the opera, its instrumentation and orchestration, its costuming and facial paintings, the types of characters, the styles of recitation, the solo singing, and the differences in the types of Peking opera. Han Kuo-Huang, a professor of music history and ethnomusicology at Northern Illinois University, also describes the changes that are happening now to opera in China. The program contains many examples and demonstrations of the various...
Source: KPFA
Continued from part two: A phone-in listener suggests that Christopher Street be blocked off to cars altogether. Another listener brings up a recent shooting at Uncle Paul's, a West Village gay bar.
Source: WBAI
"Little" Jimmy Scott is interviewed by hosts Bill Barlow and Jerry Washington before Ruth Brown's performance at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. Brown performs "Secret Love" (00:06:08), introduces the band and performs "Looking Back" (00:11:09), "5-10-15 Hours" (00:17:57), "Be Anything, But Darling Be Mine" (00:22:51 with extended intro), "Teardrops from My Eyes" (00:34:28), "This Bitter Earth" (00:38:36 with extended...
Source: Pacifica National Program
Hosts Bill Barlow and Jerry Washington interview Charles Brown (1922 - 1999) at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater in Washington, D.C. Rhythm and blues singer LaVern Baker (1929 - 1997) performs "Shake a Hand" (00:08:24), "Tweedlee Dee" (00:13:55), "I Cried a Tear" (00:18:20), "Bumble Bee" (00:22:51), "Tomorrow Night" (00:26:37), "I'm Leaving It All Up to You" (00:32:35), "See See Rider" (00:36:09), "Nobody Knows You...
Source: Pacifica National Program
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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34 year-old American bass opera singer Elfego Esparza, born in Texas, discusses his opera training and career. He began singing at the age of 17. After being advised to train in Europe, he went to Germany to study, then returned to the United States to further his training. He has performed at the Metropolitan Opera, the San Francisco Opera Company, and several opera houses throughout Europe.
Source: KPFA
The first of the four part series examines the relationship between African-Americans and Jewish communities in the United States, particularly why the relationship has become the focus of such controversy. Utilizes music, storytelling, poetry, discussions, and interviews. Several speakers examine the complex inner life of the two diverse communities, internal crisis of leadership, generation gaps, dissent, and repression.The recording features interviews with author/activist Cornel West,...
Source: KPFA
Continued from part one: Ryan discusses getting mugged and how the criminal justice system works to discredit the accounts of gay-bashing victims based on their sexuality. Phone calls from listeners recounting their personal experiences of violence on and around Christopher Street. The hosts discuss what could be done to improve Christopher Street, how to help "derelict" members of the gay community who aren't getting the support system that they need, and the integration of newer...
Source: WBAI
KPFK's Claire Loeb interviews Rudi Gernreich, the terror of the fashion world. He explains why his models carry guns, expresses his sympathy with embattled women, proclaims the end of fashion, and elaborates his views on unisex. He also castigates the coercive practices of the fashion industry, particularly the Press and Women's Wear Daily. Recorded January 18, 1971The recording begins with the song "I've Got Five Dollars" and ends with "Island in the West Indies" both sung...
Source: KPFK
Jack Spicer delivers his first Vancouver lecture, "Dictation and 'A Textbook of Poetry'", recorded at Warren Tallman's house in 1965. A complete transcript of this talk is available in Peter Gizzi, ed., The house that Jack built: the collected lectures of Jack Spicer (Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1998, 24-42). Contains Spicer reading excerpts from "A Textbook of Poetry."
Source: KPFA
Cal Green of WBAI's The Critical People talks to artist Andy Warhol about his film Chelsea Girls. Henry Geldzahler, associate curator of American painting and sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Paul Morrissey, film critic and director, and International Velvet and Ingrid Superstar, two of Andy Warhol's "Factory girls" join them in the studio. Green and guests discuss how Chelsea Girls is different from Warhol's previous films and chat about other filmmakers and artists such...
Source: WBAI
Moctesuma Esparza introduces folk singer Suni Paz, who performs some songs and discusses her life and career. Paz talks about her work with El Grupo, a bilingual activism and poetry-based musical ensemble who performed in New York and Puerto Rico. She performs Victor Jara's "La plegaria a un labrador" (00:05:00), "Chile, paloma herida" (00:30:11), "Niña mujer" (00:36:01). "Anunciando" (00:40:53). "La bamba chicana" (00:48:11) and an untitled...
Source: KPFK
Eric Bentley speaks with four men who came out as gay professionals: Dr. Howard Brown, former Public Health Commissioner of the City of New York; Dr. Bruce Voeller, executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force; Dr. Dan William, medical resident at New York University and Mr. Ron Hellman, third-year medical student at SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Drs. Brown and Voeller talk about how they hope the Task Force will inspire changes in the younger generation. They also discuss...
Source: WBAI
Judy Mowatt (1952 - ), reggae singer and one-time member of the I-Three's and backup singer for Bob Marley and the Wailers, performs live with the One Vibe Band at SOB's (co-presented by WBAI-FM), her first live solo performance in New York City. She performs "Only a woman", "Down in the valley", "Slave queen", "Concrete jungle", "Big woman", "Many are called", "Sister's chant", "One love" (featuring Peter Tosh),...
Source: WBAI
Bob Milne of the Mattachine Society and the hosts of The New Symposium discuss incidents of violence against the New York City gay community. Milne recounts two separate instances of such violence in the NYC subway and also describes efforts by Mattachine to work with the police to stem anti-gay violence. Milne also talks about his own arrest for a consensual private sexual act in Rhode Island. Program begins with news, reviews and the reading of a letter from a listener.
Source: WBAI
Erika Seastrom, a member for 20 years of the Printers Union, describes her life working under terrible conditions in an almost entirely male trade. Seastrom describes the working conditions in New York City print shops, the extreme health hazards to employees, and the way in which she was harassed by men because she wore a skirt to work.Contains sensitive language. Contains recorded music.
Source: WBAI
Three Staten Island residents, Frank Pacifico, Bernard Dacue, John Quinn and a reporter for the Staten Island Register, Joe Quelin, discuss with Nick Egleson their opposition to a tank farm for LNG - Liquid Natural Gas - near their homes. The dangers are unquenchable fires and explosions, and the benefits seem to be only in the form of profits for the four international corporations involved in the operation. They include the Cabot Corporation and the national oil company of Algeria.
Source: WBAI
Jane Fonda of the Indochina Peace Campaign talks with Paul McIsaac about Haskell Wexler's Introduction to the Enemy , a film she co-produced with Tom Hayden about North Vietnam. Fonda discusses why she set out to make the film and the film's "gentle" approach to the issues it portrays. Fonda talks about the ramifications of the implementation of the Paris Peace Accords for both North and South Vietnam. They discuss Fonda and Hayden's easy passage between North and South Vietnam and...
Source: WBAI
A dramatic presentation of the personal correspondence of Vincent Van Gogh to his brother, Theo, adapted from The Complete Letters of Vincent Van Gogh (Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society, 1958). Produced by David Rapkin, adapted by Bonnie Bellow and Terry Shtob with musical direction by James Irsay. Performed by John Lithgow and Co.
Source: WBAI
A radio adaptation of Monique Wittig's surrealistic drama about militant feminist consciousness transformed into action. The play imagines a literal battle of the sexes in which women, having taken up arms, triumph against an army of men. Contains recorded music. Adapted from an English translation of Les guérillères , trans. David Le Vay (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1971).
Source: KPFK
Singer-songwriter Judy Collins discusses her music, her politics and her career with KPFK's Barbara Cady. She talks about her artistic process, her prison reform activism, the emergence of women's music, and firing her manager. She also talks about music venues ripping off audiences with expensive ticket prices.
Source: KPFK
Alex Paul talks with Studs Terkel (May 16, 1912 - October 31, 2008) about his new book "American Dreams: Lost and Found." Terkel speaks to a Miss America winner, farm kids, city kids, a KKK member, and immigrants about what they consider to be their American Dream.
Source: WBAI
The recording is of a benefit concert for the Sunset Hall retirement home in Los Angeles, which provides housing for senior citizens who have dedicated their lives to social action movements. The host provides a brief history and purpose of Sunset Hall. Ross Altman begins by singing "The Ballad of Sunset Hall". Pete Seeger sings "Abiyoyo", "We Shall Not Be Moved", "Stay on Freedom", "Soon Mama", "My Whole World", "Viva La Quince...
Source: KPFK
Opens with music from Anderson's 1979 Cabrillo College Music Festival performance: untitled tape-bow violin performance; Closed Circuits"; "Born, Never Asked"; and "The Language of the Future". Laurie Anderson talks with Susan Sailow about how shaping time is at the core of her art, her studio, electronics and how performing is just like playing at home to her. They discuss the interaction between visual and aural elements of her art. Anderson talks about using printing...
Source: KPFA
KPFK's Jude McGee presents a two-hour special for International Women's Day on women composers in classical music with in-studio guest JoAnn Falletta, conductor of the Women's Philharmonic. Falletta talks about the great women composers from the baroque period through to contemporary times and her work with the National Women Composers Resource Center. The Women's Philharmonic plays Ellen Zwilich's "Concerto grosso 1985", Marianna Martines' "Sinfonia in C", Camilla de...
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Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Al Gene Besser reviews the art, anti-art assemblage exhibit at the Civic Center Museum which consists of 200 works. He describes the difference in the styles of Dadaists, cubists, surrealists, and futurists and speaks about the influence in the art pieces.RECORDED: Mar. 1962. BROADCAST: KPFA, 8 Apr. 1962.
Source: KPFA
Vito Russo, author of The Celluloid Closet , in discussion with journalist Marcia Pally and Jim Fouratt from ACT/UP NY. The guests talk about the media's disproportionate focus on heterosexuals in the AIDS crisis and how the most prominent voices, like Cardinal O'Connor, are fighting against teaching safe sex. Russo talks about the assignation of blame between the "innocent" (i.e. children born with HIV or people who acquire it accidentally through transfusion) and the...
Source: WBAI
Musical performance of spaced out jam of two fine tunes, "Oh! Puss!" and "Snapshots at the Gallery". Richard Greene plays the violin, Melvin Dismuke performs on the trumpet, and Tom Burton on the soprano saxophone. Dismuke and Burton are from Ghetto Sounds.
Source: KPFT
Composer Kay Swift (1897 - 1993), the first woman to score a complete musical (1930's Fine and dandy ), recounts her life. She talks about her early love of opera and how she was able to break into Broadway. She talks about how she came to collaborate with George and Ira Gershwin and the ballet she composed for George Balanchine, Alma mater , and how she left behind the Broadway life to run away to a ranch in Oregon. Swift reads excerpts from her 1940 memoir Who could ask for anything more? ....
Source: WBAI
Paul Lion interviews painter Lee Waisler who dumped a truckload of three tons of manure in front of the Los Angeles Times in reaction to an unfavorable review of his paintings and discusses art reviews. Waisler wanted to demonstrate to other artists that it is possibly to respond to the media in a constructive, nonviolent action. Lion reads a couple of reviews, one of someone else's work and one of Waisler's work. Listeners call in to share their opinion on Waisler's response to the reviewer as...
Source: KPFK
Live coverage of the first demonstration against the Gulf War in Washington, D.C, hosted by Amy Goodman and Robert Knight. Goodman reports on the day's news in the Middle East. Rev. David A. Robinson from the Metropolitan Ecumenical Ministry in Newark, NJ who reports on the church's anti-war activities. Santiago Nieves from WBAI reports live from Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C. on activities and speeches in the park. Goodman reports on the suicide of San Francisco activist Richard...
Source: Pacifica National Program
Part 2 of Bob Fass' interview with the cast and director of the Broadway musical Doonesbury . Reathel Bean joins in the discussion by phone. Fass plays man-on-the-street commentary by people who enjoyed the musical. Each cast member explains what they think the musical is about. Fass plays a tape of composer Liz Swados talking about her compositional process for Doonesbury and Levy talks about the show's family-friendliness. Music edited out of program.
Source: WBAI
Press conference at which Tom Hayden and Jane Fonda, of the Indochina Peace Campaign, discuss their conversations with North Vietnamese officials and their actions against the war in Vietnam in New York City. Hayden discusses how Americans need to pressure Nixon to sign peace agreements ensuring a friendly government controlling South Vietnam. Fonda addresses the anger and confusion of many Americans regarding US involvement in Vietnam. Fonda and Hayden take questions from the audience.
Source: WBAI
Viv Sutherland introduces the second tape from the a reading by writer, professor, and actor June Jordan originally broadcast on Women's Studies in 1980. At the second reading at the "Read It Today" in Washington Heights, Eleanor Ebissert an editor for the literary magazine 13th Moon speaks about Jordan's background. Jordan reads "Problems of Translation: Problems of Language", "The Test of Atlanta", along with several other poems. The first 10 seconds of the...
Source: WBAI
Jeanne Siegal interviews artist Roy Lichtenstein who was an abstract expressionist for many years, then was later labeled as a pop artist. He adopted the calligraphic comic strip style and historic benday dots ordinarily identified with advertising. Lichtenstein, who is both a painter and sculptor, discusses his work and views on recent developments in art.
Source: WBAI