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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 18, 2020 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 10.003m: the chancellor warns business leaders that there will "not be alignment" with eu rules in any post—brexit trade agreement and that some businesses will benefit while "some won't". a clock projected on the walls of downing street — one of a series of events announced to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu. british scientists say the number of people already infected by a new virus emerging in china is far greater than official figures suggest. heavy rain and thunderstorms in australia help to tackle the bushfires but bring flooding to some areas. following campaigns, free sanitary products will be available to all schools and colleges in england from monday.
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in sport, simply the bess — england's spinner helps his side to take total control in the third test against south africa. the travel show heads to america to find out about a project to re—hydrate virginia's interestingly—named great dismal swamp. the chancellor has warned manufacturers that "there will not be alignment" with the eu after brexit and insists firms must "adjust" to new regulations. sajid javid has made the comments in today's financial times, where he's also written that not all businesses will benefit from brexit.
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he says: "there will not be alignment, we will not be a ruletaker, we will not be in the single market and we will not be in the customs union — and we will do this by the end of the year". he added, "we're talking about companies that have known since 2016 that we are leaving the eu". with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down to brexit on 31st january. meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring the moment the uk leaves has raised more than a quarter of a million pounds. our political correspondent helen catt has more. it's here that the moment of brexit itself will be marked at 11pm on 31st january. a light show and countdown will be projected onto the walls of downing street and live streamed on social media. borisjohnson is planning an address to the nation in the evening. in nearby parliament square, the union flag will fly
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on every flagpole. commemoratives 50p coins will come into circulation. but the government says they want this to be a moment to heal divisions and reunite communities. a special cabinet meeting will take place in the north of england. many brexiteer had hoped that this would be the focal point, though. big ben restored to chime at 11pm. hundreds of thousands of pounds has been raised by the public towards the estimated £500,000 cost after borisjohnson told breakfast on tuesday he had in idea. on tuesday he had an idea. we're working up a plan so people can bung a bob for a big ben bong. there are some people who want to... i haven't quite worked it out. but downing street stepped back from the idea after the commons authorities said there might be problems accepting the money even if enough was raised. 0ur political correspondent susana mendonca is here. tell us a bit more about this
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interview. this is a real departure over what we were hearing from sajid javid's predecessor, philip hammond talking about there being close alignment. philip hammond saying they would be no alignment with the eu after brexit and sent to businesses, get ready for this. we have had 3.5 years knowing we would leave the european union, he says. many of those businesses would say we have had a lot of uncertainty. we know that last year the automotive, food and drink and pharmaceutical sectors were all saying that if there wasn't alignment and key eu rules that could be damaging to them. sajid javid is saying that some businesses will suffer, other businesses will do well. he is making that assessment that will not be great for every business. in terms of those businesses, they don't know which rules the chancellor is talking about, he hasn't outlined which rules they would want to drop. this sets the
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tone for those negotiations that we know the government has to have with the european union. they are setting out they will not be rule takers and they will have a tough negotiating position, i think. what will this mean for the different sectors? we don't know the details of the government's strategy yet. has there been any response from business? not yet, we are hoping to get some. they will need to look at what are the regulations that are the ones that could potentially change how they could potentially change how they could prepare for that. they will wa nt to could prepare for that. they will want to know which rules we are talking about here. for those businesses, there is still a period of time. although we leave the eu on the 31st of january there is still that 11 month transition period before which a deal is supposed to before which a deal is supposed to be done. businesses will have time to prepare. for a lot of them they will want to know what are the roots
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we are talking about. it is a tough message for the chancellor to be delivering today. the labour party is trying to find a new leader, the first hustings today. yes, held in liverpool, a part of the country where they won. there are those who are saying that labour should have more hustings in parts of the country where they didn't win seats and where they need to win back seats. the first hustings today has defied leadership candidates that will be taking to the platform and setting out their stalls are being questioned by labour members. these hustings will continue up until mid—february. at the moment, what the various candidates are trying to do is get the support that they need from the constituency labour parties. they need to get 5% of support from the constituency labour parties and also from unions and affiliates. they need to get three affiliates, at least two of them being unions in order to go to the
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next stage. in mid—february, those who have managed to get that support go to the next stage with the voting happens. it is until the 4th of april when we get the results on who the new labour leader is. are they going tojust the new labour leader is. are they going to just change leader or will they change direction? that is the key question, depending on who they choose that will give an idea of the direction of the labour party in the yea rs direction of the labour party in the years to come. thank you. scientists say the number of people infected by the new respiratory virus that has emerged in the chinese city of wuhan is likely to be far higher than official figures suggest. there are 41 laboratory confirmed cases of the virus, which is related to sars, but experts in london estimate the true number is closer to 1,700. the alarm has prompted screening at airports across asia and in the us. gareth barlow reports.
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this is wuhan, the chinese city where the mystery virus was first identified. an outbreak that has since turned deadly. scores of infections have been confirmed but now a team at imperial college in london estimates the true figure is around 1,700 cases. while the outbreak is centred in china, there have been two cases in thailand and one injapan. we are not able to...to prohibit people from travelling so what we can do is detecting and bring any suspected to receive treatment from our service facility. airports in asia and the united states have begun screening travellers arriving from wuhan. the uk team behind the study said that, while they're concerned, it was too early to be alarmist.
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the virus is similar to sars, which killed almost 800 people and infected over 8,000 in 2002. it looks like the virus is closely related to sars, which you mentioned previously. since sars emerged, people have been developing vaccines and drugs to see if they work against sars. the problem is this virus is different. we do not know yet if those drugs and those vaccines work. chinese scientists says there has been no cases of the virus spreading between humans and that it came about from infected animals at a seafood and wildlife market. but the team at imperial college argues the possibility of substantial human—to—human tranmission should be considered more seriously. identifying how the virus is spread will be crucial to understanding its threat and how best to react. gareth barlow, bbc news. professorjohn 0xford is a virologist at queen mary, university of london. thank you very much forjoining us.
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it starts a model of the kind of virus we are talking about behind you. yes, it is a good representation of the family corona virus of which this virus is a member. we know quite a lot about the family and i could give us a lot of information in the background. 0ne of information in the background. one thing we know about the coronavirus family is that they are not global, they are not pandemic, so not global, they are not pandemic, so if anybody thinks this is going to grow into a fast pandemic sweeping around the world and affecting billions of people that is the wrong interpretation. coronaviruses don't act like that, they are much more circumspect. the sars outbreak, the biggest one we have had, 8,000 people in the whole world, that's all, in a world of 8 billion, were infected. we are dealing here with the virus that will not be hugely global. you might get a case coming to england on an
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aeroplane, or a couple of cases. that is what is happening around the world, a case here or there. based on the knowledge of the family from the past we can predict that this virus can be contained even without vaccines or antiviral drugs. we are seeing it spread outside china and the numbers of those infected does not seem certain yet, does it? no, it doesn't. the mathematical analysis coming out, it is a bit of analysis coming out, it is a bit of a guess. everyone thinks that maths is very precise and if you come up with the vigour of 1700 it must mean something, but i think it is a guess, myself. personally, ithink there will be more than a0. there must be because one of the people arriving in thailand had not been to the marketplace, so where did they get the virus from? probably from a person who had it. i don't think the
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insinuation from some people that the chinese are covering up, i don't think that at all. science in china is high—quality nowadays. they react well with the who, interact well. it is not a bad place to be working with at all. a pretty high powered scientific community. we are all in a bit ofa scientific community. we are all in a bit of a scramble, but nevertheless i don't see this virus is developing into anything huge, but it still needs attention at this stage. better to give it attention at this stage with the numbers are exceedingly low rather than just wait around for those numbers to increase. how has it spread, how has it emerged in the first place and is it emerged in the first place and is it being spread from human to human? these corona viruses, the sars outbreak in 2003 and the middle east outbreak, both of those came from
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bats via a mammal. in the 2003 outbreak in china the virus moved from a fruit bat to a civic cat. the cats were in the market, people using them as food supply. people picked it up from a cats. with the merits outbreak, it looked like it emerged from a fruit bat to a camel, then people pick it up from a camel. that is the way a it. it does fit the pattern that this new virus, this new corona will have emerged from this market. it is most likely from this market. it is most likely from an animaland from this market. it is most likely from an animal and that animal could have been in contact with the bat. it will find it difficult to jump from that species, which is why outbreaks like this are rare. it will find it even more difficult, as
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is the way of it, to move from human to human, but it has done that a little bit. we knew that in a couple of families in china, family members have got infected. that is not surprising for a virus. in general terms, i think the chinese have gone through thousands of contacts and the one in that voice and has been infected. it looks to me as if this virus, fair enough it is a corona, is less deadly because the three people who died were over 65 and had pre—existing medical conditions. it looks less deadly than the sars virus. top would be the sars virus, the middle one would be the middle east and virus, and then bottom on the list of danger would be this one
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today. would be this one today. heavy rain and thunderstorms have lashed parts of eastern australia dousing some long—burning bushfires, but bringing a new threat of flooding. there have been downpours in the states of queensland, victoria and new south wales, where wildfires have scorched millions of hectares of land since september. it's been described as a once—in—100—year event. we can get the latest now from phil mercer, who is in sydney this morning. update us on where things are at the moment. australia is a land well used to nature's extremes, but this isa used to nature's extremes, but this is a country being confronted by fires that continue to burn, very significant storms bringing large amounts of rain to parts of eastern australia and there have been parts of this country that remained dry, so of this country that remained dry, so this is a country that in queensland, for example, parts of queensland, for example, parts of queensland experienced three times
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the monthly rainfall average injust one night. that brought flooding to many areas and this rainfall is a blessing and a curse. it is a blessing and a curse. it is a blessing because some of that rain has fallen on fire grounds, and bushfires aiding the emergency effort that stretches all the way back to september, so significant rainfall here in new south wales and the state of victoria, but with the rain comes the risk of flooding and also the risk of contamination. there are fears that ash from some charred areas of bushland could leach into rivers and water systems affecting the drinking supplies of australians. we haven't seen any evidence of that yet but it does remaina evidence of that yet but it does remain a factor in the rain that is continuing here in eastern australia. significantly, the psychological boost. australians in the last couple of days waking up to grey skies full of rain. that is
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lifting the spirits of the beleaguered country that is battling dozens beleaguered country that is battling d oze ns of beleaguered country that is battling dozens of bushfires and a long—standing joint. what we need is more rain and the authorities to caution that the heavens to need to still continue to open and give us flooding rain if this bushfire crisis is to come finally to any sort of conclusion. the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor warns business leaders that there will "not be alignment" with eu rules in any post—brexit trade agreement — and that some businesses will benefit while "some won't". a clock projected on the walls of downing street — one of a series of events announced to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu. british scientists say the number of people already infected by a new virus emerging in china is far greater than official figures suggest.
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sport now and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. and then's cricketers have had a great morning in port elizabeth on day three of the third test against south africa. tom bess took two wickets in the first half an hour, both caught by ollie pope after his century yesterday. just before lunch, he took his tally to five wickets in the innings, leaving south africa on 113—5, with england leading by 386. george elwes is back in the england women's squad for the 2020 world cup in australia which sta rts 2020 world cup in australia which starts at the end of next month. she replaces kirsty gordon in the only change from the recent win against pakistan. england are hoping to win the title for the first time since 2009. it will be a fantastic
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tournament. there are competitive teams across the board. india are looking really good, south africa, oui’ looking really good, south africa, our first round match, looking really good, south africa, ourfirst round match, is looking really good, south africa, our first round match, is a looking really good, south africa, ourfirst round match, is a big game for us. they are playing really well. new zealand looked really dangerous, as well. there are so many good teams so it'll be an exciting competition and will have to be playing well definitely. exciting competition and will have to be playing well definitelym exciting competition and will have to be playing well definitely. it is scottish cup fourth weekend adventures began their campaign by seeing off stranraer last night. stranraer are bottom of league 1, but they managed to pull rangers just before half—time. and jermaine defoe penalty finished the job. if you are watching a premier league match today he may well see the referee using the pitch side vir monitor. michael 0liver referee using the pitch side vir monitor. michael oliver is the only referee to have used on the season. they have been told to avoid using them because it could slow down the
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pace of the game. the guidance is to check the replace patch site for red ca rd check the replace patch site for red card decisions, so the on field referee has the final say. stuart bingham enjoys a late night, it would seem. he made a stunning recovery at the masters snooker coming from a—1 down to beat kieran wilson 6—a and reached the semifinals. the match finished at 12:10am having started at seven o'clock in the evening. people face david gilbert this afternoon after shaun murphy takes on ali carter. both matches are live across the bbc. heading towards the australia open, dan evans has put his atp cup captain in its place. tim henman had been extremely complimentary about him across the tournament but when he was asked how he could get even better, he suggested he could miss a few meals. just because you were a
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good tennis player doesn't mean you are an expert in all fields. tim has plenty of opinions and that was his opinion on the subject. i will leave him to it. i am pretty fits. it is just how i look, i guess. i don't think there is much of me, really. we are less than a day away from the return of one of the biggest names in mixed martial arts. conor mcgregorfights in in mixed martial arts. conor mcgregor fights in las in mixed martial arts. conor mcgregorfights in las vegas in the early hours tomorrow morning. he suggested he would earn £80 million for his fight. it is the irishman's first fight in over a year. we haven't really gone on to big discussions about what the exact fight strategy is in terms of if he will take and join fight strategy is in terms of if he will take andjoin in fight strategy is in terms of if he will take and join in the first round, will be banging big punches, that has not really be nets. it will
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bea that has not really be nets. it will be a master class, a lot of pressure from the get go and that will not let up. that is all your support for now. a man's due to appear at sheffield magistrates' court this morning charged with the attempted murder of a 12—year—old boy who was injured in a shooting last weekend. the boy, who police say was an "innocent bystander", was hit in the leg after the incident in the arbourthorne area of the city. stephen dunford, who's 25, has also been charged with possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. free sanitary products are to be made available to all schools and colleges in england, to support students who struggle to afford them. the government—funded scheme starts on monday and has been welcomed by campaigners. 0ur education and family correspondent frankie mccamley reports. free sanitary products are to be made available to all schools just over two years ago, outside downing street, campaigners gather, calling for an end to so—called period poverty. the shame of our
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periods needs to go. everyone's got them! not the first time concerns have been raised about the affordability of sanitary products, specifically for girls from lower income families. research has found nearly a third of teenage girls in school or college have or know someone who has been impacted by poverty, with more than half admitting they have missed lessons due to periods, because of things like cramps, embarrassment or affordability. ultimately, if you are facing impossible decisions, struggling to make ends meet, trying to decide whether to pay your rent or heat your house, and actually, the question of buying menstrual products, although they are completely essential, actually really becomes a second—tier priority. from monday, all primary schools, secondary schools and colleges in england will be provided with free period products for their students. the move follows scotland's announcement last year to spend £1 million on a similar initiative and in wales, just over £3 million
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£a million on a similar initiative and in wales, just over £3 million was announced earlier this month to supply girls in primary and secondary schools with sanitary products. frankie mccamley, bbc news. i'm joined now via webcam by emma holtam from the phs group, specialists in healthcare hygiene. they are providing the sanitary products that are going to go into schools. thanks forjoining us. can you just tell us how exactly these products are going to be distributed and offered to young girls and how people will make sure that children are not too embarrassed to ask for them? the process will be all schools on monday will receive an e—mailfrom phs. schools on monday will receive an e—mail from phs. all they schools on monday will receive an e—mailfrom phs. all they need to do is click on the link and it will ta ke is click on the link and it will take them through to a simple to use online portal, at what they want to their cart from a wide range of products. we have a brand—new warehouse in the west midlands stack to the rafters with millions of
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period products. they add what they want, we will then deliver it directly to the school within five days. once they are on site, it is about making them available for the pupils. have you been working with schools on how to distribute these products are the girls are not too embarrassed to ask for them? absolutely. we have been working in partnership with the department for education. they will also be sending guidance to schools about the best way to make the products available to the girls when they are in the school. it is about making them available in a number of places, so the easiest way possible for a girl to access it without causing a big deal about it. presumably you would wa nt deal about it. presumably you would want them in girls toilets, etc. yes, some of them put them in the
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nurse's office, in many of the offices, sometimes in the classroom ina draw. offices, sometimes in the classroom in a draw. it isjust offices, sometimes in the classroom in a draw. it is just about making sure it is less of a big deal. the products are available, which is really, really important for tackling the issue of period equality and making sure that girls can go to school even if they have the period, it should make a difference. people might be surprised that given these products individually or not that expensive to buy, people in this country can't afford them. and it is a real issue. absolutely that is the case. there are many families in the uk where they have the choice of either putting food on the table or buying period products. sadly, that is the issue that some people face. imagine if you are a girl in a family and for so many days out of every month you can go to school because you have got your periods. many thanks
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for joining have got your periods. many thanks forjoining us. many thanks forjoining us. four teachers in los angeles are suing the us carrier delta airlines for negligence after a pilot dumped fuel over their primary school playground earlier this week. the teachers say the fuel burned their skin, eyes and throats and sent children screaming for cover. donna larsen reports. this is the moment thousands of litres of aviation fuel rained down on los angeles. delta airline's flight 89 dumped the fuel on tuesday, before making an emergency landing shortly after take—off. dozens of children and teachers outside in playgrounds, as the plane flew overhead, required medical treatment for skin irritation and breathing difficulties. i began feeling a light drizzle on my hair, my face, my body. i thought it was rain and then i caught the scent of fuel. i started yelling for my students
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to come back inside the building. in a statement released on wednesday, the airline said... i was scared. yeah, i was scared too. we were all scared. despite the airline saying that normal procedure was followed, the teachers' lawsuit alleges the delta airline pilot did not inform air traffic control of the need to jettison the fuel. had the delta pilot notified air—traffic personnel of the need to dump fuel, the flight would have been directed by air traffic control to a location and to an altitude from which fuel could be released without danger to the teachers, the students
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and others at the school. more teachers and students' families mayjoin the lawsuit, amid concerns about the long—term health impacts from the exposure to toxins. donna larson, bbc news. the american actor hank azaria says he'll no longer voice the character of apu — an indian immigrant and the owner of a convenience store in the simpsons. accusations of racism have dogged the character for years, partly because mr azaria is white. apu is one of the oldest characters on the simpsons, which has been running for more than 30 years. a law has been passed banning pub crawls and happy hours in three popular spanish tourist destinations in a bid to crack down on alcohol—fuelled holidays. restrictions apply to the tourist hotspots of playa de palma and magaluf in majorca, and san antonio in ibiza. the regional government says it's the first legislation of its kind in europe.
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authorities in italy have discovered a painting by austrian artist gustav klimt stolen 23 years ago, believed to be worth some $60 million. the painting, ‘portrait of a lady', was taken from a gallery in the city of piacenza, with investigators believing the art work to have been stolen through a skylight. in december, a workerfind the painting in the gallery wall. in december, a workerfind the painting in the gallery wall. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there, most of us will enjoy dry weather this weekend. we are seeing some wintry showers in scotland. those will continue to become fewer through the rest of the day. becoming dry for northern ireland, northwestern, but a high cloud here spilling down towards wales on the south—west, otherwise we will see these skies and pointy sunshine. six to 8 degrees, that is near—normal for this time of year.

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